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  • Dr. Jill C. Tarter, 2014 Jansky Lecturer
    Dr. Jill C. Tarter, 2014 Jansky Lecturer

SETI, Astrobiology Pioneer Awarded Jansky Lectureship

September 2, 2014
Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have awarded the 2014 Karl G. Jansky Lectureship to Dr… Read More
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Advancing STEM Education – AUI’s STEM Education Development Officer Releases Book

July 25, 2014
At a recent book release event hosted by the Woodrow Wilson International Center forScholars, Einstein Fellows: Best Practices in STEM Education received strong reviews… Read More
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  • NRAO's highly regarded 40 Foot Telescope, the cornerstone of Green Bank's educational initiatives and the starting point for many future astronomers, including the students of RATs.
    NRAO's highly regarded 40 Foot Telescope, the cornerstone of Green Bank's educational initiatives and the starting point for many future astronomers, including the students of RATs. NRAO/AUI/NSF

NRAO Media Tip Sheet June 2014: Science, engineering, and technology milestones

June 27, 2014
Topics in this issue: 1. VLBA Helps Measure Expansion in the Current Universe: The VLBA and other radio telescopes tracked the motion of 429 distant celestial objects to better calculate how fast the Universe is expanding… Read More
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Science

  • A slice of the Laniakea Supercluster in the supergalactic equatorial plane -- an imaginary plane containing many of the most massive clusters in this structure. The colors represent density within this slice, with red for high densities and blue for voids -- areas with relatively little matter. Individual galaxies are shown as white dots. Velocity flow streams within the region gravitationally dominated by Laniakea are shown in white, while dark blue flow lines are away from the Laniakea local basin of attraction. The orange contour encloses the outer limits of these streams, a diameter of about 160 Mpc. This region contains the mass of about 100 million billion suns.
    A slice of the Laniakea Supercluster in the supergalactic equatorial plane -- an imaginary plane containing many of the most massive clusters in this structure. The colors represent density within this slice, with red for high densities and blue for voids -- areas with relatively little matter. Individual galaxies are shown as white dots. Velocity flow streams within the region gravitationally dominated by Laniakea are shown in white, while dark blue flow lines are away from the Laniakea local basin of attraction. The orange contour encloses the outer limits of these streams, a diameter of about 160 Mpc. This region contains the mass of about 100 million billion suns. Credit: SDvision interactive visualization software by DP at CEA/Saclay, France.

Newly Identified Galactic Supercluster Is Home to the Milky Way

September 3, 2014
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation’s Green Bank Telescope (GBT) — among other telescopes — have determined that our own Milky Way galaxy is part of a newly identified ginormous supercluster of galaxies, which they have dubbed “Laniakea,” which means “immense heaven” in Hawaiian… Read More
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  • With parallax technique, astronomers observe object at opposite ends of Earth's orbit around the Sun to precisely measure its distance.
    With parallax technique, astronomers observe object at opposite ends of Earth's orbit around the Sun to precisely measure its distance. Alexandra Angelich, NRAO/AUI/NSF

Radio Telescopes Settle Controversy Over Distance to Pleiades

August 28, 2014
Astronomers have used a worldwide network of radio telescopes to resolve a controversy over the distance to a famous star cluster — a controversy that posed a potential challenge to scientists' basic understanding of how stars form and evolve… Read More
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  • Radio/optical composite of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex showing the OMC-2/3 star-forming filament. GBT data is shown in orange. Uncommonly large dust grains there may kick-start planet formation.
    Radio/optical composite of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex showing the OMC-2/3 star-forming filament. GBT data is shown in orange. Uncommonly large dust grains there may kick-start planet formation. S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF); We acknowledge the use of NASA's SkyView Facility located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

Orion Rocks! Pebble-Size Particles May Jump-Start Planet Formation

August 27, 2014
Rocky planets like Earth start out as microscopic bits of dust tinier than a grain of sand, or so theories predict. Astronomers using the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered that filaments of star-forming gas near the Orion Nebula may be brimming with pebble-size particles — planetary building blocks 100 to 1,000 times larger than the dust grains typically found around protostars… Read More
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Alma

  • Artist impression of the T Tauri star AS 205 N and its companion. New ALMA data suggest that the disk around the star may be expelling gas via a wind.
    Artist impression of the T Tauri star AS 205 N and its companion. New ALMA data suggest that the disk around the star may be expelling gas via a wind. P. Marenfeld (NOAO/AURA/NSF)

Infant Solar System Shows Signs of Windy Weather

September 22, 2014
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have observed what may be the first-ever signs of windy weather around a T Tauri star, an infant analog of our own Sun… Read More
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  • Single frame from animation showing rotation after galactic merger, as detected by the Doppler Shift seen in the CO gas emission.
    Single frame from animation showing rotation after galactic merger, as detected by the Doppler Shift seen in the CO gas emission. NAOJ

Galaxy Mergers Defy Expectations to Produce Disk Galaxies:

September 14, 2014
ALMA helps explain dearth of elliptical galaxies Galaxy mergers are quite common throughout the history of the Universe and for decades astronomers believed that these cosmic collisions led primarily to the formation massive elliptical galaxies… Read More
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  • Planet Uranus as seen with ALMA's Band 10 receivers.
    Planet Uranus as seen with ALMA's Band 10 receivers. NRAO/AUI/NSF; ALMA (NRAO/ESO/NAOJ)

ALMA Achieves New Observing Capabilities

September 10, 2014
High Frequency Vision Shows Uranus in New Light The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has reached a major milestone by extending its vision fully into the realm of the submillimeter, the wavelengths of cosmic light that hold intriguing information about the cold, dark, and distant Universe… Read More
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